U.S. Embassy in Ethiopia Travel Alert: Exercise Increased Caution!

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In May 1989, I wrote a book bearing the title “ETHIOPIA An Empire Under Fire And in Crisis: Is it On the Eve of Death or Total Transformation?”(see the book cover below)

The title of the book and the burning issues it raised in Ethiopia, then under the rule of the Derg, is just as relevant and important in Ethiopia today under the rule of the EPRDF. In other words, once again Ethiopia is under serious threat of disintegration and collapse under the watch of its Prime Minister, Abiy Ahmed. Indeed, I could safely state that the acute crisis in Ethiopia has reached its final and most crucial stage: i.e. Ethiopia has now entered a stage beyond redemption. In order to understand fully why this is the return of the Era of the Princes (also known as Zemena Masafinin) – the period in Ethiopian history from 1769 to 1855, when the central government was destroyed and the country split into three different provinces: Amhara, Shoa and Tigray – read the alert of the US Embassy in Ethiopia.  

Drs Tsegezab Gebregergis

Mdrebahri.com

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Exercise increased caution when traveling in Ethiopia due to sporadic civil unrest and communications disruptions.  Some areas have increased risk.  Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do Not Travel To:

  • Somali Regional State due to potential for civil unrest,terrorism, kidnapping, and landmines.

Reconsider Travel To:

  • Ethiopia’s Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region (SNNPR) due to civil unrest.
  • The East Hararge region and the Guji zone of Oromia State due to armed conflict andcivil unrest.
  • Benishangul Gumuz and the western part of Oromia State due to armed conflict and civil unrest.
  • Border areas with Kenya, Sudan, South Sudan, and Eritrea due tocrime, armed conflict, and civil unrest.

Incidents of civil unrest and ethnic violence may occur without warning.

The Government of Ethiopia has restricted or shut down internet, cellular data, and phone services during and after civil unrest.  These restrictions impede the U.S. Embassy’s ability to communicate with, and provide consular services to, U.S. citizens in Ethiopia.

The U.S. Embassy has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens outside of Addis Ababa.  As a precaution, U.S. government personnel must request permission for any travel outside of Addis Ababa (personal and official), and are required to carry personnel tracking devices and, in some cases, satellite phones.  U.S. government personnel and their families may not travel to the areas listed as Level 3 and Level 4 in this Travel Advisory except for official business and with prior approval from the Embassy.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Ethiopia:

  • Monitor local media for breaking events and be prepared to adjust your plans.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Have evacuation plans that do not rely on U.S. government assistance.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program(STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebookand Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reportfor Ethiopia.
  • S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Somali Region—Level 4:  Do Not Travel
Civilians have been killed and injured in civil unrest along the Oromia-Somali Regional State border and in military operations against armed groups in the Ogaden and Hararge areas.
Terrorists maintain a presence in Somali towns near the Ethiopian border, presenting a risk of cross-border attacks and kidnappings.
Landmines are present in this region.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Ethiopia’s Southern Nations, Nationalities, and People’s Region (SNNPR)—Level 3: Reconsider Travel
Civil unrest in the region has resulted in deaths, looting, and the burning of buildings.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

The East Hararge Region and Guji Zone of Oromia State—Level 3:  Reconsider Travel
Civil unrest and armed conflict have resulted in injuries and deaths in parts of Oromia State.  Government security forces have used lethal force in some areas.
Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Benishangul Gumuz and the western part of Oromia State—Level 3:  Reconsider Travel
Civil unrest and armed conflict have resulted in injuries and deaths around the border between Benishangul Gumuz and the western part of Oromia State.  Government security forces have used lethal force in some areas.

Border Areas with Kenya, Sudan, South Sudan, and Eritrea—Level 3:  Reconsider Travel
Crime, armed conflict, and the potential for ethnic conflict exist near the Ethiopian borders with Kenya, Sudan, South Sudan, and Eritrea.

Source: ECADF

 

 



1 COMMENT

  1. Questions?
    Where there a country called Ethiopia before Menelik 2nd?19th century?
    Where there Nations with known borders in Africa before the scramble of Africa/colonialism?
    Before 1769 where was the so called centralized Ethiopia, where even there wasn’t a country called Ethiopia?Where was its borders? who centralized it? from which period to which period of time ? Proof?
    You said, split in three provinces 1769-1855: Amhara, Shoe, and Tigray. What about the other regions of present Ethiopia? Was there a country unifying the mentioned 3 provinces, what was its name?

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